I'm gonna need more hangers.

first i have to apologize for the inconsistent lighting/editing, i was rushing to get this done and started at funny times. anyway this post is about how to turn a shirt sleeveless like a pro. well, sort of.

ANYWAYS, so i had added the straps that you see underneath and altered the shoulders to fit me a long time ago, but i decided i needed more sleeveless shirts for the summer. it feels weird to undo your own handiwork, but i’m pretty ruthless with a seam ripper. just do it. don’t even think.

step 1: undo seams

do a little under the armpit so the new hem folds over.

step 2: refit shoulders

try it on inside out and pin where you want it. keep doing this until its perfect. i find that you might need to cut off bits to create concave curves inwards, instead of just a straight cut. see for yourself.

step 3: notch the curves

this makes it easier for the hem to curve along the shirt. we’re going to fold the hem over twice to hide the raw edges, so make the notch a little less than halfway.

step 4: fold new hem and sew

sew somewhere 2/3 or 3/4’s away from the edge (towards the shirt) so that it catches the folded under part and traps it inside. otherwise, it’ll escape and that’s not good. this is gonna look so pretty you’ll come all over yourself. i do every time. true story.

told you.

1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

for hemming pants, i do what’s called a “parallel stitch.”

step 1: fold hem back, iron it down.

it makes it easier to hem.

step 2: start hemming

tie a knot at the end of the thread, but don’t make it a double thread. for hem’s, a single will do. generally, you start at one end of the hem where the pant seams start. you also want to push the needle through the seam too, to make it more secure, so i technically made a boo boo on one leg. but that doesn’t matter cause i finished it that way. :)

step 3: parallel stitching

first you go onto the pant leg itself, which i have already done, and find a single thread of fabric to poke the needle through. this is a bit tedious at first, but it gets easier as you go. this allows the hem to be virtually invisible on the other side. alternate going from the hem side to the pant side.

step 4: continue stitching and finish off with a knot

it’s pretty simple, but i’ve been doing these awhile, so let me know if you have questions.

category: DIY
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1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

so i changed my mind. sewing a button is pretty basic, but there’s a couple tricks you might like to know.

step 1: marking the spot

when you try on the pants, mark the place where you want the new button placed. i chose the far end of the button hole, but i made sure it didnt make the pants pucker strangely in the front.

step 2: tying the end of the thread

this is a trick i learned from my mom for tying the end of a thread, single or double. loop the thread around your finger and hold the crossed area between your thumb and your index finger. without moving your thumb, pull your index finger back so that it twists the thread around itself. pull the long end to tie the knot. it takes a bit of practice, but it definitely speeds things up. maybe i’ll do a video on this, its a bit tricky to explain.

step 3: loop it through the button a few times

i did it three times and didn’t make the loops super tight. you’ll see why in the next step.

step 4: secure the button threads

this is something not often done, but its important so that the threads are stable. on the last loop through the button, stop before you puncture the fabric. wrap the thread around threads underneath the button a few times. go through the button holes again and then puncture the fabric to finish.

step 5: closing knot

i accidentally did this without thinking, so now i’m doing this on a scrap piece. to make a secure knot on the back, use your needle as an anchoring point like in the first picture. pull the other end of the thread to make it tight.

when the needle is pas the fabric, press your finger on the cross section and continue pulling through. i tied the thread off after 3 rounds of this, but you can do more or less depending on the fabric.

done!

i’m a thrifter and sometimes i just find things that are only half perfect, but half perfect is enough. when i saw these, it instantly recalled to mind these punky babies from awhile back. they’re a great fit, but there were two major issues with them: 1) the rise was above my belly button 2) bottoms were horrendously flared. i’m a big fan of altering, as you can tell, so for $2.50, i was willing to invest some time into these. these pants are actually the perfect conduit for showing how to alter pants, so i will be doing them in 2 installments.

altering these pants involves:

1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

the last two steps are pretty basic things, so i decided it was more trouble putting up than its worth. if anyone really really wants to know, i’ll post something later. i was starting to get really sick of plaid on the screen.

step 1: refitting the legs

technically, the first step is to undue the hem of the pants. you’ll have to rehem them in the end, but that’s a later installment.

i wanted the pants to have a slim/straight leg fit, so i chose a pair of my khaki pants that have a similar fit. try to choose a pair that have the same amount of stretch.

line up the crotches (teehee) and then you center the slimmer pant legs on top of the other. pin the new pant seams using the other pair as a stencil.

step 2: sew

sew along the pins and remove them as you go.

step 3: re-refit and sew

try them on again inside out and refit them if necessary. i pinned the length of the area that needed to be slimmer and drew it out with some dried soap. repeat the sewing process.

step 4: run it through a serger

a serger creates a nice finishing seam by cutting off excess fabric as it sews.

to finish off the pant legs, iron a new hemline and hem those suckers up.