I'm gonna need more hangers.
category: DIY
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jacket [newyork&co]

this is a perfectly cozy moto jacket sweater but it was never exciting enough for me. it lacks the bells and whistles of the real thing: the belt, the buckles, the hard-edged zippers, LEATHER, so i’ve been wanting to turn it into something more sculptural. here’s how i did it and it’s really not terribly hard; it just takes a bit of patience. and love. lots of love.

 

step 1: undo the seams

first, i undid the seams of the bottom band in the back and one sleeve. feel free to do both sleeves, but i ended up liking the asymmetric look better. 

step 2: mark the back arc

i chose the end of the arc to be in the middle of the jacket, so i folded it hotdog style first and made a mark. then i folded it hamburger style and marked the rest of the arc. if you don’t have tailor’s chalk, or chalk period, a bar of old soap is perfect. in fact, i prefer it because its free. bahahhaha.

step 3: cut

step 4: refitting the back

this step is pretty crucial and may take some trial and error to find the right fits. if you notice, the bottom is too short to reattach because of the length of the arc made, so how to you make it fit?

you shorten the arc! if you notice on the right, i’ve folded up about an inch or more of the fabric in a triangular shape, where the hypotenuse is the side on the table and the short leg is the edge of the arc. it needs to be a triangular fold and not a parallelogram because you don’t want to create weird puckering underneath the armholes of the sleeves (if you choose to keep them) or shorten the armhole (if you omit them).  line up the short leg along the edge of the arc as you’re folding/fitting so that it stays even. i did two going towards the arm holes and another right down the center back.

alternatively, you could just do one down the center, i just chose to do 3 because i like the way it looks. skip to step 7 if you’re only doing one fold.

step 5: sew and trim

only sew the inside and check afterwards to see that everything still lines up. mine actually doesn’t line up perfectly, but it’s ok because it gets sewn over with the bottom piece.

step 6: sew again (opt.)

fold over one flap and sew again onto the jacket back, with a little bit of space between seams so it looks like the photo on the right when the jacket is worn. i did this to keep the new flap in place and it matched the seams on the jacket. you could finish it with a serger before this step, but i chose not to.

step 7: pin bottom to arc

this is where you make sure the refitted back is the same length as the bottom piece. pin it as close to the center as possible and make the final triangular fold down the middle. it helps to fold the jacket in half to center it. you could mark all of this, but i like eyeballing. i don’t really know why. maybe because i’m lazy in odd ways.

step 8: sew down center flaps and sew on bottom piece

this goes with the design and will keep it from breaking . alternatively, you could just use a serger over the new seam and skip this step. here are my results of the outside, after i’ve sewn on the bottom hem. i did the seam for the bottom the same way i did the triangular flaps.

step 9: armholes (opt.)

i made the armhole a bit larger, folded it over about a cm, repinned, and hemmed it with two parallel seams.

finished product

please let me know what if you have any questions or if i need to be more clear about some steps!