I'm gonna need more hangers.

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shoes [jeffrey campbell] :: sweater [oh! jamae] :: skirt [borrowed, ASOS]

but i’m waiting waited anyway. these. are. so. alice-in-wonderful. i can’t get yellow/teal out of my mind. after what seemed like forever, i got these 8’s (i wear 7’s) and with two pairs of socks, they’re the perfect winter boots to cheer me up among the army of ant boots i keep seeing. not that i don’t want a pair of those either, but yellow shoes have become my thing. this is my 3rd pair.

a special thanks to Emilie @ plumforpolly.com. she is unbelievably sweet and helped me and my annoying inquiries every step of the way. i can’t thank her enough, honestly. also, her kids are a beautiful example of why i want half kids.

jeans [colorfe]

1) i wear make up everyday to work. and take a break on weekends, save for evenings out of course. it started because my mentor teacher got me some and i was obligated, but i gotta admit, it’s really freakin fun to doll up. its a bit different than an american routine, mostly in terms of brands and something called “bb cream.” more later.

2) i’m obsessed with skincare. even moreso. i have this strict routine in addition to normal face washing which involves toner+lotion+eye cream. like make up, it’s a joy to hunt for the perfect brand/products. i’ve always wanted to have one of those “like-omg-i’ve-been-using-this-for-ages” types of deals and be a huge asshole about it.

3) i don’t wash my hair everyday which is actually a big deal for me, cuz i’m so used to clean hair. i wash it every other day or every 2 days and it’s been a lot more healthy. it’s also getting close to nipple length WHICH MAKES ME SO HAPPY. you don’t even know, it’s just been a long time. maybe perfect length by january?

4) i braid my hair. a lot, i’ve been trying different styles when my hair is dirty. this one is my current favorite.

5) i’m back on the pattern mixing train. the minimalist thing was super fun and its definitely still a part of me but korea is waaaaaay too homogenous for me and patterns is how i’m punch-protesting their drugged-dragged style in the face. yes these are new jeans. i dont really like denim but omg…what would you do if you saw drop crotch polka dotted goodness?

vogue nippon [aug2011, jun2011] :: elle france [jun2011]

slits + cut outs. i don’t know how to convey how drawn i am to these except to force them down your eyes. frequently.

1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

for hemming pants, i do what’s called a “parallel stitch.”

step 1: fold hem back, iron it down.

it makes it easier to hem.

step 2: start hemming

tie a knot at the end of the thread, but don’t make it a double thread. for hem’s, a single will do. generally, you start at one end of the hem where the pant seams start. you also want to push the needle through the seam too, to make it more secure, so i technically made a boo boo on one leg. but that doesn’t matter cause i finished it that way. :)

step 3: parallel stitching

first you go onto the pant leg itself, which i have already done, and find a single thread of fabric to poke the needle through. this is a bit tedious at first, but it gets easier as you go. this allows the hem to be virtually invisible on the other side. alternate going from the hem side to the pant side.

step 4: continue stitching and finish off with a knot

it’s pretty simple, but i’ve been doing these awhile, so let me know if you have questions.

category: DIY
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1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

so i changed my mind. sewing a button is pretty basic, but there’s a couple tricks you might like to know.

step 1: marking the spot

when you try on the pants, mark the place where you want the new button placed. i chose the far end of the button hole, but i made sure it didnt make the pants pucker strangely in the front.

step 2: tying the end of the thread

this is a trick i learned from my mom for tying the end of a thread, single or double. loop the thread around your finger and hold the crossed area between your thumb and your index finger. without moving your thumb, pull your index finger back so that it twists the thread around itself. pull the long end to tie the knot. it takes a bit of practice, but it definitely speeds things up. maybe i’ll do a video on this, its a bit tricky to explain.

step 3: loop it through the button a few times

i did it three times and didn’t make the loops super tight. you’ll see why in the next step.

step 4: secure the button threads

this is something not often done, but its important so that the threads are stable. on the last loop through the button, stop before you puncture the fabric. wrap the thread around threads underneath the button a few times. go through the button holes again and then puncture the fabric to finish.

step 5: closing knot

i accidentally did this without thinking, so now i’m doing this on a scrap piece. to make a secure knot on the back, use your needle as an anchoring point like in the first picture. pull the other end of the thread to make it tight.

when the needle is pas the fabric, press your finger on the cross section and continue pulling through. i tied the thread off after 3 rounds of this, but you can do more or less depending on the fabric.

done!

category: DIY
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1) refitting the legs

2) shortening the rise

3) hemming pant legs

4) sewing a button

so the first problem being solved (the leg fit), the second problem with the pants is that the rise is too high. i almost tried to imagine them in their heyday, but i caught myself. luckily for me, it’s a bottom fly and easier to fix than a zipper. it involves cutting off the original waistband, the offensive excess rise, and refitting a new waistband.

step 1: measure the waistband cut

the photo is slightly incorrect actually because i measured 3″ out later, but you get the idea. the waistband is a piece of fabric covering the top layer, but it also fastens. i measured down to the top of the 3rd button from the bottom (where i wanted my new waistband to hit).

alternatively you don’t have to measure out all the way around the waistband: you can just align the cut portion over the uncut portion, folding and cutting as you go.

step 2: undo the hem of the original waistband

the white portion you see there is the interface, to give the fabric more structure. keep that together with the waist band, you want it exactly as it was, just in a new locale.

step 3: pin the old waistband hem onto the pants

once the old waistband has been freed, repin them onto the pants (right side out). there is a portion of the waist band that folds over, so to recreate that evenly, fold the waistband in half over the pants. then, fold half of that half back onto itself like shown. this will create a line for you to follow pinning the new waistband along.

as you’ve probably gathered, the new waistband is a bit short in length. what you’ll do in a later step is extend the pants but cutting up scraps of the rise and sewing them on.

step 4: sew on the waistband to the pants, allowing a 1/4″ seam

i neglected to photog this part, but its pretty self-explanatory. do not go all the way through the unfinished part of the waistband, you need to save enough room to be able to sew on the extended piece.

step 5: extending the waistband

measure out how much more of the waistband needs to be covered. use scraps of fabric from the rise and make sure the length fits the bill and the width is the same as the waistband currently attached, in order to match. in my case, i need 3 scrap pieces.

step 6: run the edges through a serger

isn’t it bootiful? :D i love serging, it’s both scary and satisfying at the same time. but that’s neither here nor there.

step 7: attach the waistband extension to the waistband

make sure all the seams are on the inside when you fold it over.

step 8: serge the attached part as well

your work should look something like this. you can new reattach the rest of the waistband until the pants are covered.

step 9: fold over the waistband

so that is covers the other seam where the waistband is attached.

step 10: sew along the outside like shown

this seam will show, so use a similar colored thread to the fabric.

you’re probably wondering about the seams on the extension piece: doesn’t it disrupt the waistband? for me, these pants have a busy pattern and i’m not really planning on wearing them to dinner parties so i’m not too worried about it. if you’re more concern about this, you can put the extension between belt loops in the back or on the sides. you  just have to the remove the belt looks beforehand. alternatively, you could cut out a new waistband from another piece of fabric. just be sure to cut on the bias so that it folds and curves when sewn, otherwise weird puckering will happy and that’s no good.

questions? let me know! i’m still relatively unsure how much detail to put or pictures. help me help you!

cardigan [h&m] :: shirt [bdg] :: pants [prada] :: bag [fiorucci] :: necklace [uo]

photos [riggallus]

i didn’t even intend for it to turn out that way. been wanting to wear these two things backwards together for awhile. i was cocaine craving color today. i couldn’t stand the b&w anymore. or am i?

class happened today. i love having class. it makes me sick when i have to cancel. when its over, i’m going to spill all over the floor.